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    Agenda

    + Expand All − Collapse All Today
    1. Nov
      11
      Fri

      1. The Fifth Global Forum of Critical Studies: Asking Big Questions Again (all-day)
        Nov 11

        CALL FOR PAPERS
        The Fifth Global Forum of Critical Studies
        Asking Big Questions Again
        11 – 12 November 2016, Lucca, Italy
        Palazzo Bernardini

        Deadline for Paper Proposals: 1st of July 2016

        The Fifth Euroacademia Global Forum of Critical Studies aims to bring into an open floor the reflexive and questioning interaction among academics, intellectuals, practitioners and activists profoundly concerned with evaluative understandings of the world we’re living in. The focus of the forum is to initiate an arena where no question is misplaced and irrelevant as long as we acknowledge that evaluation, critical thinking and contestation are accessible trajectories to better understand our past, present and alternative scenarios for the future.

        Conference Description:
        Some say that the 21st Century or modernity altogether made humans more concerned with doing rather than being. As the classical Greek civilization valued the most reflexive thinking as a form of freedom from natural necessities, contemporary times profoundly involve individuals and the imaginary accompanying social practices in a restless logic of consumption, competition and engagement that profoundly – or some would say, radically – suspends or indefinitely postpones the autonomous capacity of human beings to question and reflect upon the social order and the meaning of social practices. The fast advancement of the logic of post-industrial societies, the gradual dissolution of alternative models to the capitalist logic and a multitude of other alerting factors pushed ahead a global spread culture of one-dimensional productions of meaning that advances a closure rather than a constant reflexive re-evaluation of cultural/social practices.

        Many alternatives at hand are often condemned to marginality or lost in the plural practices where everything goes as long as it’s part of an intellectual market. The ‘fatal strategies’ of post-industrial societies to keep individuals captive, busy and seduced by contingent social arrangements and economic practices minimized the questioning detachment required to evaluate and give meaning through reflexive criticism and unlimited interrogation. Various labels were given to our unfolding times from apocalyptic ones to some more comforting yet not by chance lacking some vital optimism. Despite a wide-spread discontent and suspicion towards the daily realities of our current societies, most of the big questions are often left outside by the self-involved active pursuit of an imagined well-being that is no longer transgressed by harsh critical evaluation of its meaning. The academic arena itself also advances, supports, integrates and promotes limited particular methodologies that generate an effect of mainstreaming and often keeps researchers or practitioners out of the battle-ground for big questions.

        The ongoing economic crisis made reality even harsher and pushed ahead the need for more thinking as many habitual categories lost their meaning or relevance. New ways of thinking could transgress some inappropriate conceptions or misconceptions that preserve their centrality due to the mechanics of habits. This is a time when a call to thinking is well-placed. This is a call to arms for critical studies that promotes alternative, questioning and multi-dimensional thinking.

        Panels:
        When it’s about critical thinking and critical studies there is intrinsically an unending open list of topics to be included. The Fourth Euroacademia Forum on Critical Studies proposes the 5 sections (that are by no means exclusive):
        • Theory/Philosophy
        • Politics
        • Cultural Studies
        • Political Economy
        • Arts and Performance

        Papers on the following topics (and not only) are welcomed:
        Diagnostics of Our Times: Where Is the 21st Century Heading? ~ Our Societies Are As Good As It Gets: How to Escape the Closure of Meaning? ~ Consumerist Societies and the Captivity of Thinking ~ The Being/Doing Nexus ~ Assessing Models of Capitalism ~ Markets, Capital and Inequalities ~ The Remains of Individual Autonomy ~ How Plural Our Societies Truly Are? ~ Debating Ideal vs. Real Multiculturalism ~ Social Narcissism and Consumerism ~ The Role of Critical Thinking: Proposing Alternative Methodologies ~ Are There Any Alternatives to Capitalism Left? ~ Social Causes and the Pursuit of Social Beliefs ~ Protest and Social Change ~ Re-Thinking Revolutions ~ Hegemony and the Remaining Possibilities for Social Criticism ~ Loneliness and Isolation in the Era of Mass Communication ~ Living Low Cost: Values, Meaning and Market Exchange ~ Ideology and Other Dominant Narratives ~ Critical Economics ~ Post-Modernism and the Critique of Modernity ~ Marx and the 21st Century ~ Debating the End of Communism ~ Non-Oppositional Societies ~ Consolation, Complicity and Passivity Today ~ Who Still Waits For A Revolution? ~ C. Castoriadis and the Project of Autonomy ~ French Thinking and Alternatives for Thought ~ Eastern Europe and the Enrollment to the School of Capitalism ~ China and the Logic of Growth ~ Crises of Culture ~ Left and Right: Political Spectrums and Pluralism Re-Discussed ~ Art as an Exchange Value ~ Originality and Complacency ~ Literatures and Authors ~ Heroes and Heroines in Electronic Literature ~ Fiction and the Fictionalization of the Contemporary World ~ Film and the Persisting Hunger for Heroic Imagination ~ The Illusory Charity and Imagined forms of Contemporary Humanisms ~ The Growing Social Irrelevance of Philosophy ~ Replacement of the Logic of Becoming by the Logic of Earning ~ How Do We Look Back at Tradition? ~ Just Wars or Unjust Thinking? ~ The Myth of Cosmopolitanism ~ Facing the Self ~ Communication, Media and Simulacrum ~ Science, Pragmatics and Vocation: Who Pays What We Can’t Sell? ~ Is There Still a Postmodern or Any Other Kind of Condition? ~ Post-Marxist Way of Looking at Facts ~ The School of Suspicion and Evaluative Thinking ~ Feminist Readings of Our Contemporary World ~ Post-Colonialism and the Refurbished Other(s) ~ Theory and Power ~ Queer Theory and Living After the Sexual Revolution ~ Subaltern Theory

        For complete information before applying see full details of the conference at:

        http://euroacademia.eu/conference/fifth-forum-critical-studies/

        You can apply on-line by completing the Application Form on the conference website or by sending a 300 words abstract together with the details of contact and affiliation until 1st of July 2016 at [email protected]

        +
        The Fifth Global Forum of Critical Studies: Asking Big Questions Again (all-day)
    2. Nov
      12
      Sat

      1. The Fifth Global Forum of Critical Studies: Asking Big Questions Again (all-day)
        Nov 12

        CALL FOR PAPERS
        The Fifth Global Forum of Critical Studies
        Asking Big Questions Again
        11 – 12 November 2016, Lucca, Italy
        Palazzo Bernardini

        Deadline for Paper Proposals: 1st of July 2016

        The Fifth Euroacademia Global Forum of Critical Studies aims to bring into an open floor the reflexive and questioning interaction among academics, intellectuals, practitioners and activists profoundly concerned with evaluative understandings of the world we’re living in. The focus of the forum is to initiate an arena where no question is misplaced and irrelevant as long as we acknowledge that evaluation, critical thinking and contestation are accessible trajectories to better understand our past, present and alternative scenarios for the future.

        Conference Description:
        Some say that the 21st Century or modernity altogether made humans more concerned with doing rather than being. As the classical Greek civilization valued the most reflexive thinking as a form of freedom from natural necessities, contemporary times profoundly involve individuals and the imaginary accompanying social practices in a restless logic of consumption, competition and engagement that profoundly – or some would say, radically – suspends or indefinitely postpones the autonomous capacity of human beings to question and reflect upon the social order and the meaning of social practices. The fast advancement of the logic of post-industrial societies, the gradual dissolution of alternative models to the capitalist logic and a multitude of other alerting factors pushed ahead a global spread culture of one-dimensional productions of meaning that advances a closure rather than a constant reflexive re-evaluation of cultural/social practices.

        Many alternatives at hand are often condemned to marginality or lost in the plural practices where everything goes as long as it’s part of an intellectual market. The ‘fatal strategies’ of post-industrial societies to keep individuals captive, busy and seduced by contingent social arrangements and economic practices minimized the questioning detachment required to evaluate and give meaning through reflexive criticism and unlimited interrogation. Various labels were given to our unfolding times from apocalyptic ones to some more comforting yet not by chance lacking some vital optimism. Despite a wide-spread discontent and suspicion towards the daily realities of our current societies, most of the big questions are often left outside by the self-involved active pursuit of an imagined well-being that is no longer transgressed by harsh critical evaluation of its meaning. The academic arena itself also advances, supports, integrates and promotes limited particular methodologies that generate an effect of mainstreaming and often keeps researchers or practitioners out of the battle-ground for big questions.

        The ongoing economic crisis made reality even harsher and pushed ahead the need for more thinking as many habitual categories lost their meaning or relevance. New ways of thinking could transgress some inappropriate conceptions or misconceptions that preserve their centrality due to the mechanics of habits. This is a time when a call to thinking is well-placed. This is a call to arms for critical studies that promotes alternative, questioning and multi-dimensional thinking.

        Panels:
        When it’s about critical thinking and critical studies there is intrinsically an unending open list of topics to be included. The Fourth Euroacademia Forum on Critical Studies proposes the 5 sections (that are by no means exclusive):
        • Theory/Philosophy
        • Politics
        • Cultural Studies
        • Political Economy
        • Arts and Performance

        Papers on the following topics (and not only) are welcomed:
        Diagnostics of Our Times: Where Is the 21st Century Heading? ~ Our Societies Are As Good As It Gets: How to Escape the Closure of Meaning? ~ Consumerist Societies and the Captivity of Thinking ~ The Being/Doing Nexus ~ Assessing Models of Capitalism ~ Markets, Capital and Inequalities ~ The Remains of Individual Autonomy ~ How Plural Our Societies Truly Are? ~ Debating Ideal vs. Real Multiculturalism ~ Social Narcissism and Consumerism ~ The Role of Critical Thinking: Proposing Alternative Methodologies ~ Are There Any Alternatives to Capitalism Left? ~ Social Causes and the Pursuit of Social Beliefs ~ Protest and Social Change ~ Re-Thinking Revolutions ~ Hegemony and the Remaining Possibilities for Social Criticism ~ Loneliness and Isolation in the Era of Mass Communication ~ Living Low Cost: Values, Meaning and Market Exchange ~ Ideology and Other Dominant Narratives ~ Critical Economics ~ Post-Modernism and the Critique of Modernity ~ Marx and the 21st Century ~ Debating the End of Communism ~ Non-Oppositional Societies ~ Consolation, Complicity and Passivity Today ~ Who Still Waits For A Revolution? ~ C. Castoriadis and the Project of Autonomy ~ French Thinking and Alternatives for Thought ~ Eastern Europe and the Enrollment to the School of Capitalism ~ China and the Logic of Growth ~ Crises of Culture ~ Left and Right: Political Spectrums and Pluralism Re-Discussed ~ Art as an Exchange Value ~ Originality and Complacency ~ Literatures and Authors ~ Heroes and Heroines in Electronic Literature ~ Fiction and the Fictionalization of the Contemporary World ~ Film and the Persisting Hunger for Heroic Imagination ~ The Illusory Charity and Imagined forms of Contemporary Humanisms ~ The Growing Social Irrelevance of Philosophy ~ Replacement of the Logic of Becoming by the Logic of Earning ~ How Do We Look Back at Tradition? ~ Just Wars or Unjust Thinking? ~ The Myth of Cosmopolitanism ~ Facing the Self ~ Communication, Media and Simulacrum ~ Science, Pragmatics and Vocation: Who Pays What We Can’t Sell? ~ Is There Still a Postmodern or Any Other Kind of Condition? ~ Post-Marxist Way of Looking at Facts ~ The School of Suspicion and Evaluative Thinking ~ Feminist Readings of Our Contemporary World ~ Post-Colonialism and the Refurbished Other(s) ~ Theory and Power ~ Queer Theory and Living After the Sexual Revolution ~ Subaltern Theory

        For complete information before applying see full details of the conference at:

        http://euroacademia.eu/conference/fifth-forum-critical-studies/

        You can apply on-line by completing the Application Form on the conference website or by sending a 300 words abstract together with the details of contact and affiliation until 1st of July 2016 at [email protected]

        +
        The Fifth Global Forum of Critical Studies: Asking Big Questions Again (all-day)
    3. Dec
      9
      Fri

      1. The Fifth Euroacademia International Conference Identities and Identifications: Politicized Uses of Collective Identities (all-day)
        Dec 9

        The Fifth Euroacademia International Conference
        ‘Identities and Identifications: Politicized Uses of Collective Identities’

        Centro Congressi – Piazza di Spagna
        Rome, Italy
        9 – 10 December 2016

        CALL FOR PAPERS
        Deadline for Paper Proposals: 1st of November 2016

        Conference description:

        Identity is one of the crown jewelries in the kingdom of ‘contested concepts’. The idea of identity is conceived to provide some unity and recognition while it also exists by separation and differentiation. Few concepts were used as much as identity for contradictory purposes. From the fragile individual identities as self-solidifying frameworks to layered in-group identifications in families, orders, organizations, religions, ethnic groups, regions, nation-states, supra-national entities or any other social entities, the idea of identity always shows up in the core of debates and makes everything either too dangerously simple or too complicated. Constructivist and de-constructivist strategies have led to the same result: the eternal return of the topic. Some say we should drop the concept, some say we should keep it and refine it, some say we should look at it in a dynamic fashion while some say it’s the reason for resistance to change.

        If identities are socially constructed and not genuine formations, they still hold some responsibility for inclusion/exclusion – self/other nexuses. Looking at identities in a research oriented manner provides explanatory tolls for a wide variety of events and social dynamics. Identities reflect the complex nature of human societies and generate reasonable comprehension for processes that cannot be explained by tracing pure rational driven pursuit of interests. The feelings of attachment, belonging, recognition, the social processes of values formation and norms integration, the logics of appropriateness generated in social organizations are all factors relying on a certain type of identity or identification. Multiple identifications overlap, interact, include or exclude, conflict or enhance cooperation. Identities create boundaries and borders; define the in-group and the out-group, the similar and the excluded, the friend and the threatening, the insider and the ‘other’.

        Beyond their dynamic and fuzzy nature that escapes exhaustive explanations, identities are effective instruments of politicization of social life. The construction of social forms of organization or imaginary (as Cornelius Castoriadis theorizes it) and of social practices together with their imaginary significations, require all the time an essentialist or non-essentialist legitimating act of belonging; a social glue that extracts its cohesive function from the identification of the in-group and the power of naming the other. Identities are political. Multicultural slogans populate extensively the twenty-first century yet the distance between the ideal and the real multiculturalism persists while the virtues of inclusion coexist with the adversity of exclusion. Dealing with identities means to integrate contestation into contestation until potentially an n degree of contestation. Due to the confusion between identities and identifications some scholars demanded that the concept of identity shall be abandoned. Identitarian issues turned out to be efficient tools for politicization of a ‘constraining dissensus’ while universalizing terms included in the making of the identities usually tend or intend to obscure the localized origins of any identitarian project. Identities are often conceptually used as rather intentional concepts: they don’t say anything about their sphere but rather defining the sphere makes explicit the aim of their usage. It is not ‘identity of’ but ‘identity to’.

        The Fifth Euroacademia International Conference ‘Identities and Identifications: Politicized Uses of Collective Identities’ aims to scrutinize the state of the art in collective identities research, to bring once more into debate the processes of identity making, identity building in both constructivist or de-constructivist dimensions. It is the aim of the conference to open the floor to dynamic multi-dimensional and inter-disciplinary understanding of identities today.

        Conference panels include the following topics:
        Welcome to the Land of Disputes: Theoretic Contributions to Understanding Identity ~ Modernity and Identity ~ Identities as Endogenous Factors in the Study of Organizations ~ Critical Approaches to Understanding Identity ~ Universal and Local in Identity Making ~ Processes of Identity Building ~ Practices of Identification ~ Identity and Inclusion ~ Identity and Exclusion ~ The Politicization of the European Identity ~ European Union and the Claims of an Emerging Supranational Identity ~ America as a Soft Power: Attraction Through Identitarian Constructs ~ Normative Powers and the Export of Identities ~ Identity and the Power of Naming the Other ~ In-Group – Out-Group Dynamics in Identity Formation ~ Identities as Endogenous Factors in Explaining Political Behaviors ~ Religion and Identities ~ Imagined Communities: Preserving Identity as A Foreigner ~ Art as an Identity Making Process ~ Folklore and the National Identity Narratives ~ History Reading and Identity Making ~ Ideal and Real Multiculturalism: How Inclusive Our Societies Are? ~ Regions and Identities ~ East/West – North/South: Imaginary Geographies of Identities ~ Core/Periphery Claims in Shaping Identities ~ Nested Identities ~ Identitarian Threats ~ Symbols of Identities: Flags, Coins, Stamps and Anthems ~ Cosmopolitanism and Supra-National Identities ~ Film and the Visual Narration of identities ~ Music and the Identitarian Signifiers ~ Literature and Identities ~ Groups, Gangs, Movements and Identities ~ Protest and Identities ~ Ethnicity and Identity ~ Regional Integration Projects and Identity Appropriations ~ Globalization and Identities ~ Uses and Miss-uses of Identities for Political Purposes ~ Organizations and Identities ~ Markets, Products and Identities ~ Consumerism and its Impact on Identity Building ~ Corporate Identity ~ Brand Identity ~ Identity and Conflict ~ Crises of Identity

        If interested in participating, please access the complete details of the event on the conference website and apply on-line or send a maximum 300 words abstract with title, together with the details of your affiliation until 1st of November 2016 at [email protected]

        For full details of the conference and on-line application please see:

        http://euroacademia.eu/conference/identities-and-identifications-fifth-edition/

        +
        The Fifth Euroacademia International Conference Identities and Identifications: Politicized Uses of Collective Identities (all-day)
    4. Dec
      10
      Sat

      1. The Fifth Euroacademia International Conference Identities and Identifications: Politicized Uses of Collective Identities (all-day)
        Dec 10

        The Fifth Euroacademia International Conference
        ‘Identities and Identifications: Politicized Uses of Collective Identities’

        Centro Congressi – Piazza di Spagna
        Rome, Italy
        9 – 10 December 2016

        CALL FOR PAPERS
        Deadline for Paper Proposals: 1st of November 2016

        Conference description:

        Identity is one of the crown jewelries in the kingdom of ‘contested concepts’. The idea of identity is conceived to provide some unity and recognition while it also exists by separation and differentiation. Few concepts were used as much as identity for contradictory purposes. From the fragile individual identities as self-solidifying frameworks to layered in-group identifications in families, orders, organizations, religions, ethnic groups, regions, nation-states, supra-national entities or any other social entities, the idea of identity always shows up in the core of debates and makes everything either too dangerously simple or too complicated. Constructivist and de-constructivist strategies have led to the same result: the eternal return of the topic. Some say we should drop the concept, some say we should keep it and refine it, some say we should look at it in a dynamic fashion while some say it’s the reason for resistance to change.

        If identities are socially constructed and not genuine formations, they still hold some responsibility for inclusion/exclusion – self/other nexuses. Looking at identities in a research oriented manner provides explanatory tolls for a wide variety of events and social dynamics. Identities reflect the complex nature of human societies and generate reasonable comprehension for processes that cannot be explained by tracing pure rational driven pursuit of interests. The feelings of attachment, belonging, recognition, the social processes of values formation and norms integration, the logics of appropriateness generated in social organizations are all factors relying on a certain type of identity or identification. Multiple identifications overlap, interact, include or exclude, conflict or enhance cooperation. Identities create boundaries and borders; define the in-group and the out-group, the similar and the excluded, the friend and the threatening, the insider and the ‘other’.

        Beyond their dynamic and fuzzy nature that escapes exhaustive explanations, identities are effective instruments of politicization of social life. The construction of social forms of organization or imaginary (as Cornelius Castoriadis theorizes it) and of social practices together with their imaginary significations, require all the time an essentialist or non-essentialist legitimating act of belonging; a social glue that extracts its cohesive function from the identification of the in-group and the power of naming the other. Identities are political. Multicultural slogans populate extensively the twenty-first century yet the distance between the ideal and the real multiculturalism persists while the virtues of inclusion coexist with the adversity of exclusion. Dealing with identities means to integrate contestation into contestation until potentially an n degree of contestation. Due to the confusion between identities and identifications some scholars demanded that the concept of identity shall be abandoned. Identitarian issues turned out to be efficient tools for politicization of a ‘constraining dissensus’ while universalizing terms included in the making of the identities usually tend or intend to obscure the localized origins of any identitarian project. Identities are often conceptually used as rather intentional concepts: they don’t say anything about their sphere but rather defining the sphere makes explicit the aim of their usage. It is not ‘identity of’ but ‘identity to’.

        The Fifth Euroacademia International Conference ‘Identities and Identifications: Politicized Uses of Collective Identities’ aims to scrutinize the state of the art in collective identities research, to bring once more into debate the processes of identity making, identity building in both constructivist or de-constructivist dimensions. It is the aim of the conference to open the floor to dynamic multi-dimensional and inter-disciplinary understanding of identities today.

        Conference panels include the following topics:
        Welcome to the Land of Disputes: Theoretic Contributions to Understanding Identity ~ Modernity and Identity ~ Identities as Endogenous Factors in the Study of Organizations ~ Critical Approaches to Understanding Identity ~ Universal and Local in Identity Making ~ Processes of Identity Building ~ Practices of Identification ~ Identity and Inclusion ~ Identity and Exclusion ~ The Politicization of the European Identity ~ European Union and the Claims of an Emerging Supranational Identity ~ America as a Soft Power: Attraction Through Identitarian Constructs ~ Normative Powers and the Export of Identities ~ Identity and the Power of Naming the Other ~ In-Group – Out-Group Dynamics in Identity Formation ~ Identities as Endogenous Factors in Explaining Political Behaviors ~ Religion and Identities ~ Imagined Communities: Preserving Identity as A Foreigner ~ Art as an Identity Making Process ~ Folklore and the National Identity Narratives ~ History Reading and Identity Making ~ Ideal and Real Multiculturalism: How Inclusive Our Societies Are? ~ Regions and Identities ~ East/West – North/South: Imaginary Geographies of Identities ~ Core/Periphery Claims in Shaping Identities ~ Nested Identities ~ Identitarian Threats ~ Symbols of Identities: Flags, Coins, Stamps and Anthems ~ Cosmopolitanism and Supra-National Identities ~ Film and the Visual Narration of identities ~ Music and the Identitarian Signifiers ~ Literature and Identities ~ Groups, Gangs, Movements and Identities ~ Protest and Identities ~ Ethnicity and Identity ~ Regional Integration Projects and Identity Appropriations ~ Globalization and Identities ~ Uses and Miss-uses of Identities for Political Purposes ~ Organizations and Identities ~ Markets, Products and Identities ~ Consumerism and its Impact on Identity Building ~ Corporate Identity ~ Brand Identity ~ Identity and Conflict ~ Crises of Identity

        If interested in participating, please access the complete details of the event on the conference website and apply on-line or send a maximum 300 words abstract with title, together with the details of your affiliation until 1st of November 2016 at [email protected]

        For full details of the conference and on-line application please see:

        http://euroacademia.eu/conference/identities-and-identifications-fifth-edition/

        +
        The Fifth Euroacademia International Conference Identities and Identifications: Politicized Uses of Collective Identities (all-day)
    5. Jan
      27
      Fri

      1. Re-Inventing Eastern Europe (The 6th Edition) (all-day)
        Jan 27

         

        27 – 28 January 2017
        Belgrade, Serbia

         

        Call for Panels and Papers

        Deadline for Paper Proposals: 10 December 2016

         
        The 6th Euroacademia International Conference ‘Re-Inventing Eastern Europe’ aims rather than asserting to make a case and to provide alternative views on the dynamics, persistence and manifestations of the practices of alterity making that take place in Europe and broadly in the mental mappings of the world. It offers an opportunity for scholars, activists and practitioners to locate, discuss and debate the multiple dimensions in which specific narratives of alterity making towards Eastern Europe preserve their salience today in re-furbished and re-fashioned manners. The conference aims to look at the processes of alterity making as puzzles and to address the persistence of the East-West dichotomies.
         
        Eastern Europe was invented as a region and continues to be re-invented from outside and inside. From outside its invention was connected with alterity making processes, and, from inside the region, the Central and Eastern European countries got into a civilizational beauty contest themselves in search of drawing the most western profile: what’s Central Europe, what’s more Eastern, what’s more Ottoman, Balkan, Byzantine, who is the actual kidnapped kid of the West, who can build better credentials by pushing the Easterness to the next border. A wide variety of scholars addressed the western narratives of making the Eastern European ‘other’ as an outcome of cultural politics of enlightenment, as an effect of EU’s need to delineate its borders, as an outcome of its views on security, or as a type of ‘orientalism’ or post-colonialism. Most of these types of approaches are still useful in analyzing the persistence of a East-West slope. The region is understood now under a process of convergence, socialization and Europeanization that will have as outcomes an ‘ever closer union’ where the East and the West will fade away as categories. Yet the reality is far from such an outcome while the persistence of categories of alterity making towards the ‘East’ is not always dismantled. The discourses on core/non-core, new Europe/old Europe, pioneers/followers, teachers/pupils, center/periphery, cosmos/chaos are often maintaining significant ground within the arena of European identity narratives often yet not exclusively voiced by the EU.
         

        See Conference Details and Apply

        +
        Re-Inventing Eastern Europe (The 6th Edition) (all-day)
    6. Jan
      28
      Sat

      1. Re-Inventing Eastern Europe (The 6th Edition) (all-day)
        Jan 28

         

        27 – 28 January 2017
        Belgrade, Serbia

         

        Call for Panels and Papers

        Deadline for Paper Proposals: 10 December 2016

         
        The 6th Euroacademia International Conference ‘Re-Inventing Eastern Europe’ aims rather than asserting to make a case and to provide alternative views on the dynamics, persistence and manifestations of the practices of alterity making that take place in Europe and broadly in the mental mappings of the world. It offers an opportunity for scholars, activists and practitioners to locate, discuss and debate the multiple dimensions in which specific narratives of alterity making towards Eastern Europe preserve their salience today in re-furbished and re-fashioned manners. The conference aims to look at the processes of alterity making as puzzles and to address the persistence of the East-West dichotomies.
         
        Eastern Europe was invented as a region and continues to be re-invented from outside and inside. From outside its invention was connected with alterity making processes, and, from inside the region, the Central and Eastern European countries got into a civilizational beauty contest themselves in search of drawing the most western profile: what’s Central Europe, what’s more Eastern, what’s more Ottoman, Balkan, Byzantine, who is the actual kidnapped kid of the West, who can build better credentials by pushing the Easterness to the next border. A wide variety of scholars addressed the western narratives of making the Eastern European ‘other’ as an outcome of cultural politics of enlightenment, as an effect of EU’s need to delineate its borders, as an outcome of its views on security, or as a type of ‘orientalism’ or post-colonialism. Most of these types of approaches are still useful in analyzing the persistence of a East-West slope. The region is understood now under a process of convergence, socialization and Europeanization that will have as outcomes an ‘ever closer union’ where the East and the West will fade away as categories. Yet the reality is far from such an outcome while the persistence of categories of alterity making towards the ‘East’ is not always dismantled. The discourses on core/non-core, new Europe/old Europe, pioneers/followers, teachers/pupils, center/periphery, cosmos/chaos are often maintaining significant ground within the arena of European identity narratives often yet not exclusively voiced by the EU.
         

        See Conference Details and Apply

        +
        Re-Inventing Eastern Europe (The 6th Edition) (all-day)
    7. Apr
      6
      Thu

      1. Heritages of Migration: Moving Stories, Objects and Home (all-day)
        Apr 6

        Deadline for applications: 14 October 2016

         
        Description
        In their movements between old and new worlds, migrant communities carry with them practices, traditions, objects and stories that are transmitted across new communities and through generations. This conference seeks to explore the layering of global cultures that has been produced by centuries of global migration, and its effect on memory, identity and belonging, as well as its effects on tangible and intangible heritage. The conference is designed to encourage provocative dialogue across the fullest range of disciplines. Thus we welcome papers from academic colleagues in a wide range of fields. Please see the conference website for full details and call for papers.
         
        Participant’s Profile
        Ironbridge International Institute for Cultural Heritage (IIICH) is a focal point for cross-disciplinary research, postgraduate teaching and policy engagement based at the University of Birmingham. The IIICH is a unique partnership formed over thirty years ago between the University of Birmingham and the Ironbridge Gorge Museum Trust (IGMT) which manages the World Heritage Site and ten museums. Our aims are: • To provide a welcoming intellectual home and a creative environment for the critical study of cultural heritage which offers new and challenging perspectives on the ways in which cultural heritage is understood, represented, managed and mobilised in different cultures and societies • To pursue research excellence, policy relevance and to engage with academic and policy communities and the heritage/ heritage-related sectors • To deliver research informed high quality postgraduate education linking theoretical understanding with practice and relevance.
         
        See full details of the call at:
        https://heritagesofmigration.wordpress.com/

        +
        Heritages of Migration: Moving Stories, Objects and Home (all-day)
    8. Apr
      7
      Fri

      1. Heritages of Migration: Moving Stories, Objects and Home (all-day)
        Apr 7

        Deadline for applications: 14 October 2016

         
        Description
        In their movements between old and new worlds, migrant communities carry with them practices, traditions, objects and stories that are transmitted across new communities and through generations. This conference seeks to explore the layering of global cultures that has been produced by centuries of global migration, and its effect on memory, identity and belonging, as well as its effects on tangible and intangible heritage. The conference is designed to encourage provocative dialogue across the fullest range of disciplines. Thus we welcome papers from academic colleagues in a wide range of fields. Please see the conference website for full details and call for papers.
         
        Participant’s Profile
        Ironbridge International Institute for Cultural Heritage (IIICH) is a focal point for cross-disciplinary research, postgraduate teaching and policy engagement based at the University of Birmingham. The IIICH is a unique partnership formed over thirty years ago between the University of Birmingham and the Ironbridge Gorge Museum Trust (IGMT) which manages the World Heritage Site and ten museums. Our aims are: • To provide a welcoming intellectual home and a creative environment for the critical study of cultural heritage which offers new and challenging perspectives on the ways in which cultural heritage is understood, represented, managed and mobilised in different cultures and societies • To pursue research excellence, policy relevance and to engage with academic and policy communities and the heritage/ heritage-related sectors • To deliver research informed high quality postgraduate education linking theoretical understanding with practice and relevance.
         
        See full details of the call at:
        https://heritagesofmigration.wordpress.com/

        +
        Heritages of Migration: Moving Stories, Objects and Home (all-day)
    9. Apr
      8
      Sat

      1. Heritages of Migration: Moving Stories, Objects and Home (all-day)
        Apr 8

        Deadline for applications: 14 October 2016

         
        Description
        In their movements between old and new worlds, migrant communities carry with them practices, traditions, objects and stories that are transmitted across new communities and through generations. This conference seeks to explore the layering of global cultures that has been produced by centuries of global migration, and its effect on memory, identity and belonging, as well as its effects on tangible and intangible heritage. The conference is designed to encourage provocative dialogue across the fullest range of disciplines. Thus we welcome papers from academic colleagues in a wide range of fields. Please see the conference website for full details and call for papers.
         
        Participant’s Profile
        Ironbridge International Institute for Cultural Heritage (IIICH) is a focal point for cross-disciplinary research, postgraduate teaching and policy engagement based at the University of Birmingham. The IIICH is a unique partnership formed over thirty years ago between the University of Birmingham and the Ironbridge Gorge Museum Trust (IGMT) which manages the World Heritage Site and ten museums. Our aims are: • To provide a welcoming intellectual home and a creative environment for the critical study of cultural heritage which offers new and challenging perspectives on the ways in which cultural heritage is understood, represented, managed and mobilised in different cultures and societies • To pursue research excellence, policy relevance and to engage with academic and policy communities and the heritage/ heritage-related sectors • To deliver research informed high quality postgraduate education linking theoretical understanding with practice and relevance.
         
        See full details of the call at:
        https://heritagesofmigration.wordpress.com/

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        Heritages of Migration: Moving Stories, Objects and Home (all-day)
    10. Apr
      9
      Sun

      1. Heritages of Migration: Moving Stories, Objects and Home (all-day)
        Apr 9

        Deadline for applications: 14 October 2016

         
        Description
        In their movements between old and new worlds, migrant communities carry with them practices, traditions, objects and stories that are transmitted across new communities and through generations. This conference seeks to explore the layering of global cultures that has been produced by centuries of global migration, and its effect on memory, identity and belonging, as well as its effects on tangible and intangible heritage. The conference is designed to encourage provocative dialogue across the fullest range of disciplines. Thus we welcome papers from academic colleagues in a wide range of fields. Please see the conference website for full details and call for papers.
         
        Participant’s Profile
        Ironbridge International Institute for Cultural Heritage (IIICH) is a focal point for cross-disciplinary research, postgraduate teaching and policy engagement based at the University of Birmingham. The IIICH is a unique partnership formed over thirty years ago between the University of Birmingham and the Ironbridge Gorge Museum Trust (IGMT) which manages the World Heritage Site and ten museums. Our aims are: • To provide a welcoming intellectual home and a creative environment for the critical study of cultural heritage which offers new and challenging perspectives on the ways in which cultural heritage is understood, represented, managed and mobilised in different cultures and societies • To pursue research excellence, policy relevance and to engage with academic and policy communities and the heritage/ heritage-related sectors • To deliver research informed high quality postgraduate education linking theoretical understanding with practice and relevance.
         
        See full details of the call at:
        https://heritagesofmigration.wordpress.com/

        +
        Heritages of Migration: Moving Stories, Objects and Home (all-day)