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    Agenda

    + Expand All − Collapse All Today
    1. Oct
      14
      Wed

      1. Deadline for Paper Proposals: The European Union and the Politicization of Europe (Fourth Edition) (all-day)
        Oct 14 – Oct 15

        Call for Papers

        Euroacademia and the School of International Relations and Diplomacy from Anglo-American University in Prague, cordially invites applications for:

        The Fourth International Conference
        The European Union and the Politicization of Europe

        27 – 28 November 2015

        To be held at Anglo-American University, Prague, Czech Republic

        Deadline for Paper Proposals: 15 October 2015

        See full details at: http://euroacademia.eu/conference/european-union-and-the-politicization-of-europe-4th-edition/

        Conference Description:
        The European Union was described by Jacques Delors as an unidentified political object and by Jose Manuel Barroso as the first non-Imperial empire. The descriptors assigned to the European Union are creative and diverse yet the agreement on what is the actual shape that the EU is taking is by no means an easy one to be achieved. Historical choices shaped and reshaped the size and functioning of the EU while the goal of an emerging ‘ever closer union’ is still in search for the paths of real and not ideal accomplishment. The agreement seems to come when it’s about the growing impact of the decisions taken in Brussels on the daily lives of the European citizens and the increasingly redistributive outcomes of the policy choices inside the EU. These dynamics created the framework for the politicization of Europe and opened a vivid debate about the direction and proportions of such a process.

        The politicization of Europe takes various shapes and addresses significant puzzles. While it is clear that the EU doesn’t resemble a state it is less clear if the decisions that shape its policies are configured by Pareto efficient outcomes or by dynamics that are intrinsic to political systems and defined by emerging party politics within the European Parliament. The democratic problem or the democratic deficit issue was and continues to be one of the main challenges facing the European Union in any terms or from any position is understood or described. The problem of accountability for the decision making inside the EU was there from the beginning and it emerged gradually as more emphatic on the agenda of vivid debates as the powers of the EU have grown after the Maastricht Treaty. This was concomitant with a growing disenchantment of citizens from member states with politics in general, with debates over the democratic deficits inside member states, with enlargement and with a visible and worrying decrease in voters’ turnouts in both national and especially European elections. The optimist supporters of EU believe in its power to constantly reinvent and reshape while the pessimists see either a persistence of existing problems or a darker scenario that could lead in front of current problems even to the end of the EU as we know it.

        The International Conference ‘The European Union and the Politicization of Europe’ aims to survey some of these current debates and addresses once more the challenges of the EU polity in a context of multiple crises that confronted Europe in recent years. It supports a transformative view that involves balanced weights of optimism and pessimism in a belief that the unfold of current events and the way EU deals with delicate problems will put an increased pressure in the future on matters of accountability and will require some institutional adjustments that address democratic requirements for decision making. However in its present shape and context the EU does not look able to deliver soon appropriate answers to democratic demands. In a neo-functionalist slang we can say as an irony that the actual crisis in the EU legitimacy is a ‘spillover’ effect of institutional choices made some time before. To address the EU’s democratic deficit however is not to be a skeptic and ignore the benefits that came with it but to acknowledge the increasing popular dissatisfaction with ‘occult’ office politics and with the way EU tackles daily problems of public concern while the public is more and more affected by decisions taken at European level.

        Is the EU becoming an increasingly politicized entity? Is the on-going politicization of Europe a structured or a messy one? Do political parties within the European Parliament act in a manner that strengthens the view of the EU as an articulate political system? Are there efficient ways for addressing the democratic deficit issue? Can we find usable indicators for detecting an emerging European demos and a European civil society? Does Europeanization of the masses take place or the EU remains a genuinely elitist project? Did the Lisbon Treaty introduce significant changes regarding the challenges facing the EU? Can we see any robust improvements in the accountability of the EU decision making processes? Are there alternative ways of looking at the politicization processes and redistributive policies inside the EU? Is the on-going crisis changing the European politics dramatically? These are only few of the large number of questions that unfold when researchers or practitioners look at the EU. It is the aim of the Fourth International Conference ‘The European Union and the Politicization of Europe’ to address in a constructive manner such questions and to offer o platform for dissemination of research results or puzzles that can contribute to a better understanding of the on-going process of politicization within the European Union.

        The conference is organized yet by no means restricted to the following panels:

        ~ The Crisis of Europe and its Political Challenges
        ~ The Crisis of European Solidarity
        ~ Greece and the Questioning of the Factual European Unity
        ~ Is Euro-enthusiasm Still Possible?
        ~ The Politicization of Europe: Desirable or Contestable
        ~ The Neo-medieval EU: Resembling an Enlightened Despotism?
        ~ The EU as a Political System: Features and Curiosities
        ~ Differentiated Integration and Club Based Hypotheses
        ~ Re-distributive Policies Inside the EU Impacting the Medium Voter
        ~ European Elections and Strategies for Politicization
        ~ European Parties and Party Politics in the European Parliament
        ~ Strategies for Bringing European Issues to Public Scrutiny
        ~ Taking ECB Out of the Political Vacuum: Strategies for Accountability
        ~ The Democratic Deficit Issue: A Persistent Anomaly?
        ~ In Search of a European Demos
        ~ Inclusion/Exclusion Nexuses
        ~ Looking for a European Civil Society
        ~ Appropriations and Politicization of Wider European Values and Narratives
        ~ Persisting Intergovernmentalism?
        ~ EU and Traces of Imperial Politics
        ~ EU and Identitarian appropriations
        ~ Scenarios for Change Inside the EU
        ~ The Future of EU Enlargement
        ~ The Europeanization of Balkans
        ~ Taking Euroskepticism Seriously
        ~ Assessing the EU External Action
        ~ Increasing Public Saliency for Supranational Issues
        ~ Lobbying and Policy Making Inside the EU
        ~ Cultural Policies and the Politicization of Europe
        ~ Educational Policies of Europeanization
        ~ Representations of EUrope
        ~ Arts and the Imaginary Shape of the EU
        ~ Mobility and Europeanization
        ~ Europe 2020 – Scenarios for Future

        Deadline:
        15 October 2015 – deadline for sending 300 words abstracts and details of affiliation

        The 300 word abstracts and the affiliation details should be submitted in Word, WordPerfect, or RTF formats, following this order:
        1) author(s), 2) affiliation, 3) email address, 4) title of abstract, 5) body of abstract 6) preferred panel or proposed panel
        The abstract and details can be sent to [email protected] with the name of the conference specified in the subject line or through the on-line application form available at http://euroacademia.eu/conference/european-union-and-the-politicization-of-europe-4th-edition/
        We will acknowledge the receipt of your proposal and answer to all paper proposals submitted.

        The conference is organized by Euroacademia in cooperation with the School of International Relations and Diplomacy from the Anglo American University in Prague, Czech Republic.

        Euroacademia is a non-profit organization, based in Paris, Brussels and Vienna, aiming to foster academic cooperation, networking and a platform for dissemination and valorization of academic research results, trends, and emerging themes within the area of concern for European studies, political science, critical studies, cultural studies, and wider and inclusive interdisciplinary and trans-disciplinary approaches that contribute to a better understanding of the ‘self-organizing vertigo’ (Edgar Morin) of the European realm. Euroacademia is a hub for academic interaction on and about Europe.
        For more information visit www.euroacademia.eu

        Anglo-American University is the oldest private institution of higher education in the Czech Republic and provides a personalized and distinctive university education in the English language. Utilizing the best from American and British academic traditions, Anglo-American University educates future leaders and global citizens in a multicultural setting of students and faculty from over 60 different countries.
        For more information visit http://www.aauni.edu/

        +
        Deadline for Paper Proposals: The European Union and the Politicization of Europe (Fourth Edition) (all-day)
    2. Nov
      12
      Thu

      1. The Fourth Forum of Critical Studies: Asking Big Questions Again (all-day)
        Nov 12 – Nov 13

        The Fourth Euroacademia Global Forum of Critical Studies aims to bring into an open floor the reflexive and questioning interaction among academics, intellectuals, practitioners and activists profoundly concerned with evaluative understandings of the world we’re living in. The focus of the forum is to initiate an arena where no question is misplaced and irrelevant as long as we acknowledge that evaluation, critical thinking and contestation are accessible trajectories to better understand our past, present and alternative scenarios for the future. The Forum is also an open stage for sharing existing or ready formed intellectual visions and expose them to dialogue and scrutiny in a critically reflective environment.

        +
        The Fourth Forum of Critical Studies: Asking Big Questions Again (all-day)
    3. Nov
      13
      Fri

      1. The Fourth Forum of Critical Studies: Asking Big Questions Again (all-day)
        Nov 13 – Nov 14

        The Fourth Euroacademia Global Forum of Critical Studies aims to bring into an open floor the reflexive and questioning interaction among academics, intellectuals, practitioners and activists profoundly concerned with evaluative understandings of the world we’re living in. The focus of the forum is to initiate an arena where no question is misplaced and irrelevant as long as we acknowledge that evaluation, critical thinking and contestation are accessible trajectories to better understand our past, present and alternative scenarios for the future. The Forum is also an open stage for sharing existing or ready formed intellectual visions and expose them to dialogue and scrutiny in a critically reflective environment.

        +
        The Fourth Forum of Critical Studies: Asking Big Questions Again (all-day)
    4. Nov
      26
      Thu

      1. The European Union and the Politicization of Europe (Fourth Edition) (all-day)
        Nov 26 – Nov 27

        Euroacademia and Anglo American University, Prague – School of International Relations and Diplomacy

        The Fourth International Conference
        The European Union and the Politicization of Europe

        27 – 28 November 2015

        Anglo American University, Prague, Czech Republic

        Is the EU becoming an increasingly politicized entity? Is the on-going politicization of Europe a structured or a messy one? Do political parties within the European Parliament act in a manner that strengthens the view of the EU as an articulate political system? Are there efficient ways for addressing the democratic deficit issue? Can we find usable indicators for detecting an emerging European demos and a European civil society? Does a Europeanization of the masses take place or the EU remains a genuinely elitist project? Did the Lisbon Treaty introduced significant changes regarding the challenges facing the EU? Can we see any robust improvements in the accountability of the EU decision making processes? Are there alternative ways of looking at the politicization processes and redistributive policies inside the EU? These are only few of the large number of questions that unfold when researchers or practitioners look at the EU. It is the aim of the Fourth International Conference ‘The European Union and the Politicization of Europe’ to address in a constructive manner such questions and to offer o platform for dissemination of research results or puzzles that can contribute to a better understanding of the on-going process of politicization within the European Union.

        The conference is organized by Euroacademia in cooperation with the School of International Relations and Diplomacy from the Anglo American University in Prague, Czech Republic.

        +
        The European Union and the Politicization of Europe (Fourth Edition) (all-day)
    5. Nov
      27
      Fri

      1. The European Union and the Politicization of Europe (Fourth Edition) (all-day)
        Nov 27 – Nov 28

        Euroacademia and Anglo American University, Prague – School of International Relations and Diplomacy

        The Fourth International Conference
        The European Union and the Politicization of Europe

        27 – 28 November 2015

        Anglo American University, Prague, Czech Republic

        Is the EU becoming an increasingly politicized entity? Is the on-going politicization of Europe a structured or a messy one? Do political parties within the European Parliament act in a manner that strengthens the view of the EU as an articulate political system? Are there efficient ways for addressing the democratic deficit issue? Can we find usable indicators for detecting an emerging European demos and a European civil society? Does a Europeanization of the masses take place or the EU remains a genuinely elitist project? Did the Lisbon Treaty introduced significant changes regarding the challenges facing the EU? Can we see any robust improvements in the accountability of the EU decision making processes? Are there alternative ways of looking at the politicization processes and redistributive policies inside the EU? These are only few of the large number of questions that unfold when researchers or practitioners look at the EU. It is the aim of the Fourth International Conference ‘The European Union and the Politicization of Europe’ to address in a constructive manner such questions and to offer o platform for dissemination of research results or puzzles that can contribute to a better understanding of the on-going process of politicization within the European Union.

        The conference is organized by Euroacademia in cooperation with the School of International Relations and Diplomacy from the Anglo American University in Prague, Czech Republic.

        +
        The European Union and the Politicization of Europe (Fourth Edition) (all-day)
    6. Jan
      29
      Fri

      1. Re-Inventing Eastern Europe (Fifth Edition) (all-day)
        Jan 29

        Euroacademia cordially invites you to The Fifth Euroacademia International Conference
        ‘Re-Inventing Eastern Europe’

        Call for Papers
        The Fifth Euroacademia International Conference
        Re-Inventing Eastern Europe

        29 – 30 January 2016

        Riga, Latvia

        Deadline for Paper Proposals: 10 December 2015

        Conference Description:

        The Fifth Euroacademia International Conference ‘Re-Inventing Eastern Europe’ aims to make a case and to provide alternative views on the dynamics, persistence and manifestations of practices of alterity making that take place in Europe and broadly in the mental mappings of the world. It offers an opportunity for scholars, activists and practitioners to identify, discuss, and debate the multiple dimensions in which specific narratives of alterity making towards Eastern Europe preserve their salience today in re-furbished and re-fashioned manners. The conference aims to look at the processes of alterity making as puzzles and to address the persistence of the East-West dichotomies.

        Not a long time ago, in 2010, a British lady was considered bigoted by Gordon Brown upon asking ‘Where do all these Eastern Europeans come from?’. Maybe, despite her concern with the dangers of immigration for Britain, the lady was right in showing that such a question still awaits for answers in Europe. The ironic thing however is that a first answer to such a question would point to the fact that the Eastern Europeans come from the Western European imaginary. As Iver Neumann puts it, ‘regions are invented by political actors as a political programme, they are not simply waiting to be discovered’. And, as Larry Wolff skillfully showed, Eastern Europe is an invention emanated initially from the intellectual agendas of the elites of the Enlightenment that later found its peak of imaginary separation during the Cold War.
        The Economist, explicitly considered Eastern Europe to be wrongly labeled and elaborated that ‘it was never a very coherent idea and it is becoming a damaging one’. The EU enlargement however, was expected to make the East – West division obsolete under the veil of a prophesized convergence. That would have finally proven the non-ontologic, historically contingent and unhappy nature of the division of Europe and remind Europeans of the wider size of their continent and the inclusive and empowering nature of their values. Yet still, 20 years after the revolutions in the Central and Eastern European countries, Leon Mark, while arguing that the category of Eastern Europe is outdated and misleading, bitterly asks a still relevant question: ‘will Europe ever give up the need to have an East?’
        Eastern Europe was invented as a region and continues to be re-invented from outside and inside. From outside its invention was connected with alterity making processes, and, from inside the region, the Central and Eastern European countries got into a civilizational beauty contest themselves in search of drawing the most western profile: what’s Central Europe, what’s more Eastern, what’s more Ottoman, Balkan, Byzantine, who is the actual kidnapped kid of the West, who can build better credentials by pushing the Easterness to the next border. A wide variety of scholars addressed the western narratives of making the Eastern European other as an outcome of cultural politics of enlightenment, as an effect of EU’s need to delineate its borders, as an outcome of its views on security , or as a type of ‘orientalism’ or post-colonialism. Most of these types of approaches are still useful in analyzing the persistence of an East-West slope. The region is understood now under a process of convergence, socialization and Europeanization that will have as outcomes an ‘ever closer union’ where the East and the West will fade away as categories. Yet the reality is far from such an outcome while the persistence of categories of alterity making towards the ‘East’ is not always dismantled. The discourse on core-periphery, new Europe/old Europe is rather gaining increasing ground in the arena of European identity narratives often voiced by the EU.

        The conference is organized yet by no means restricted to the following panels:

        The Agenda of the Enlightenment: Inventing Eastern Europe ~ Europe East and West: On the Persistence of the Division ~ Reviewing Alternative Modernities: East and West ~ Writing About the East in West ~ Writing about the West in East ~ The Eastern European ‘Other’ Inside the European Union ~ Mental Mappings on Eastern Europe ~ People-ing the Eastern Europeans ~ Geopolitical Views on the East-West Division ~ Post-colonial readings of Eastern Europe ~ Making Borders to the East: Genealogies of Othering ~ Inclusion/Exclusion Nexuses ~ Myths and Misconceptions on Eastern Europe ~ Core Europe/Non-Core Europe ~ Central Europe vs. Eastern Europe ~ Reading the Past: On Memory and Memorialization ~ Eastern Europe and the Crises ~ Assessing Convergence in Eastern Europe ~ Explaining Divergence in Eastern Europe ~ Central and Eastern Europe and the EU ~ Scenarios for the Future of Eastern Europe ~ Eastern Europe and Asymmetries of Europeanization ~ Axiological Framings of Eastern Europe ~ Eastern Europe in Western Literature ~ Re-making Eastern Europe: Pushing the Easterness to the Next Border ~ From the Ottoman Empire to Russia: Cultural Categories in the Making of Eastern Europe ~ Go West! Migration from Eastern Europe and Experiences of ‘Othering’ ~ Lifestyles and the Quotidian Peculiarities of the Invented East ~ Visual Representation of Eastern Europe in Film: From Dracula to Barbarian Kings ~ Guidebooks for the Savage Lands: Representations of Eastern Europe in Travel Guides ~ Urban Landscapes in Eastern Europe ~ Changing Politics and the Transformation of Cities ~ Eastern Europe and Artistic Movements

        Participant’s Profile
        The conference is addressed to academics, researchers and professionals with a particular interest in Eastern Europe from all parts of the world. Post-graduate students, doctoral candidates and young researchers are welcome to submit an abstract. Representatives of INGOs, NGOs, Think Tanks and activists willing to present their work with impact on or influenced by specific understandings of Eastern Europe are welcomed as well to submit the abstract of their contribution.

        Abstracts will be reviewed and accepted based on their proven quality. The submitted paper is expected to be in accordance with the lines provided in the submitted abstract.

        DEADLINE FOR 300 WORDS ABSTRACTS SUBMISSION IS 10TH OF DECEMBER 2015

        The 300 word abstracts and the affiliation details should be submitted in Word, WordPerfect, or RTF formats, following this order:
        1) author(s), 2) affiliation, 3) email address, 4) title of abstract, 5) body of abstract 6) preferred panel or proposed panel

        The abstract and details can be sent to [email protected] with the name of the conference specified in the subject line or through the on-line application form available at www.euroacademia.eu

        We will acknowledge the receipt of your proposal and answer to all paper proposals submitted.

        For complete information before applying please see:

        http://euroacademia.eu/conference/fifth-reinventing-eastern-europe/

        +
        Re-Inventing Eastern Europe (Fifth Edition) (all-day)
    7. Jan
      30
      Sat

      1. Re-Inventing Eastern Europe (Fifth Edition) (all-day)
        Jan 30

        Euroacademia cordially invites you to The Fifth Euroacademia International Conference
        ‘Re-Inventing Eastern Europe’

        Call for Papers
        The Fifth Euroacademia International Conference
        Re-Inventing Eastern Europe

        29 – 30 January 2016

        Riga, Latvia

        Deadline for Paper Proposals: 10 December 2015

        Conference Description:

        The Fifth Euroacademia International Conference ‘Re-Inventing Eastern Europe’ aims to make a case and to provide alternative views on the dynamics, persistence and manifestations of practices of alterity making that take place in Europe and broadly in the mental mappings of the world. It offers an opportunity for scholars, activists and practitioners to identify, discuss, and debate the multiple dimensions in which specific narratives of alterity making towards Eastern Europe preserve their salience today in re-furbished and re-fashioned manners. The conference aims to look at the processes of alterity making as puzzles and to address the persistence of the East-West dichotomies.

        Not a long time ago, in 2010, a British lady was considered bigoted by Gordon Brown upon asking ‘Where do all these Eastern Europeans come from?’. Maybe, despite her concern with the dangers of immigration for Britain, the lady was right in showing that such a question still awaits for answers in Europe. The ironic thing however is that a first answer to such a question would point to the fact that the Eastern Europeans come from the Western European imaginary. As Iver Neumann puts it, ‘regions are invented by political actors as a political programme, they are not simply waiting to be discovered’. And, as Larry Wolff skillfully showed, Eastern Europe is an invention emanated initially from the intellectual agendas of the elites of the Enlightenment that later found its peak of imaginary separation during the Cold War.
        The Economist, explicitly considered Eastern Europe to be wrongly labeled and elaborated that ‘it was never a very coherent idea and it is becoming a damaging one’. The EU enlargement however, was expected to make the East – West division obsolete under the veil of a prophesized convergence. That would have finally proven the non-ontologic, historically contingent and unhappy nature of the division of Europe and remind Europeans of the wider size of their continent and the inclusive and empowering nature of their values. Yet still, 20 years after the revolutions in the Central and Eastern European countries, Leon Mark, while arguing that the category of Eastern Europe is outdated and misleading, bitterly asks a still relevant question: ‘will Europe ever give up the need to have an East?’
        Eastern Europe was invented as a region and continues to be re-invented from outside and inside. From outside its invention was connected with alterity making processes, and, from inside the region, the Central and Eastern European countries got into a civilizational beauty contest themselves in search of drawing the most western profile: what’s Central Europe, what’s more Eastern, what’s more Ottoman, Balkan, Byzantine, who is the actual kidnapped kid of the West, who can build better credentials by pushing the Easterness to the next border. A wide variety of scholars addressed the western narratives of making the Eastern European other as an outcome of cultural politics of enlightenment, as an effect of EU’s need to delineate its borders, as an outcome of its views on security , or as a type of ‘orientalism’ or post-colonialism. Most of these types of approaches are still useful in analyzing the persistence of an East-West slope. The region is understood now under a process of convergence, socialization and Europeanization that will have as outcomes an ‘ever closer union’ where the East and the West will fade away as categories. Yet the reality is far from such an outcome while the persistence of categories of alterity making towards the ‘East’ is not always dismantled. The discourse on core-periphery, new Europe/old Europe is rather gaining increasing ground in the arena of European identity narratives often voiced by the EU.

        The conference is organized yet by no means restricted to the following panels:

        The Agenda of the Enlightenment: Inventing Eastern Europe ~ Europe East and West: On the Persistence of the Division ~ Reviewing Alternative Modernities: East and West ~ Writing About the East in West ~ Writing about the West in East ~ The Eastern European ‘Other’ Inside the European Union ~ Mental Mappings on Eastern Europe ~ People-ing the Eastern Europeans ~ Geopolitical Views on the East-West Division ~ Post-colonial readings of Eastern Europe ~ Making Borders to the East: Genealogies of Othering ~ Inclusion/Exclusion Nexuses ~ Myths and Misconceptions on Eastern Europe ~ Core Europe/Non-Core Europe ~ Central Europe vs. Eastern Europe ~ Reading the Past: On Memory and Memorialization ~ Eastern Europe and the Crises ~ Assessing Convergence in Eastern Europe ~ Explaining Divergence in Eastern Europe ~ Central and Eastern Europe and the EU ~ Scenarios for the Future of Eastern Europe ~ Eastern Europe and Asymmetries of Europeanization ~ Axiological Framings of Eastern Europe ~ Eastern Europe in Western Literature ~ Re-making Eastern Europe: Pushing the Easterness to the Next Border ~ From the Ottoman Empire to Russia: Cultural Categories in the Making of Eastern Europe ~ Go West! Migration from Eastern Europe and Experiences of ‘Othering’ ~ Lifestyles and the Quotidian Peculiarities of the Invented East ~ Visual Representation of Eastern Europe in Film: From Dracula to Barbarian Kings ~ Guidebooks for the Savage Lands: Representations of Eastern Europe in Travel Guides ~ Urban Landscapes in Eastern Europe ~ Changing Politics and the Transformation of Cities ~ Eastern Europe and Artistic Movements

        Participant’s Profile
        The conference is addressed to academics, researchers and professionals with a particular interest in Eastern Europe from all parts of the world. Post-graduate students, doctoral candidates and young researchers are welcome to submit an abstract. Representatives of INGOs, NGOs, Think Tanks and activists willing to present their work with impact on or influenced by specific understandings of Eastern Europe are welcomed as well to submit the abstract of their contribution.

        Abstracts will be reviewed and accepted based on their proven quality. The submitted paper is expected to be in accordance with the lines provided in the submitted abstract.

        DEADLINE FOR 300 WORDS ABSTRACTS SUBMISSION IS 10TH OF DECEMBER 2015

        The 300 word abstracts and the affiliation details should be submitted in Word, WordPerfect, or RTF formats, following this order:
        1) author(s), 2) affiliation, 3) email address, 4) title of abstract, 5) body of abstract 6) preferred panel or proposed panel

        The abstract and details can be sent to [email protected] with the name of the conference specified in the subject line or through the on-line application form available at www.euroacademia.eu

        We will acknowledge the receipt of your proposal and answer to all paper proposals submitted.

        For complete information before applying please see:

        http://euroacademia.eu/conference/fifth-reinventing-eastern-europe/

        +
        Re-Inventing Eastern Europe (Fifth Edition) (all-day)
    8. Mar
      4
      Fri

      1. Identities and Identifications: Politicized Uses of Collective Identities (Fourth Edition) (all-day)
        Mar 4
        The Fourth Euroacademia International Conference

        Identities and Identifications

        Politicized Uses of Collective Identities

         

        CALL FOR PANELS AND PAPERS

        4 – 5 March 2016
         
        Cultural Centre – Don Orione Artigianelli

        Venice, Italy

         

        Deadline: 15th of January 2016

        http://euroacademia.eu/conference/identities-and-identifications-fourth-edition/

        +
        Identities and Identifications: Politicized Uses of Collective Identities (Fourth Edition) (all-day)
    9. Mar
      5
      Sat

      1. Identities and Identifications: Politicized Uses of Collective Identities (Fourth Edition) (all-day)
        Mar 5
        The Fourth Euroacademia International Conference

        Identities and Identifications

        Politicized Uses of Collective Identities

         

        CALL FOR PANELS AND PAPERS

        4 – 5 March 2016
         
        Cultural Centre – Don Orione Artigianelli

        Venice, Italy

         

        Deadline: 15th of January 2016

        http://euroacademia.eu/conference/identities-and-identifications-fourth-edition/

        +
        Identities and Identifications: Politicized Uses of Collective Identities (Fourth Edition) (all-day)
    10. Mar
      31
      Thu

      1. Inheriting the City: Advancing Understandings of Urban Heritage (all-day)
        Mar 31

        Inheriting the City: Advancing Understandings of Urban Heritage
        CALL FOR PAPERS

        Deadline for applications
        Call for papers: 20/11/15
        Earlybird discount: 21/12/15

        Website of the Event:

        https://inheritingthecity.wordpress.com/

        Participant’s Profile
        Ironbridge International Institute for Cultural Heritage (IIICH) is a focal point for cross-disciplinary research, postgraduate teaching and policy engagement based at the University of Birmingham. The IIICH is a unique partnership formed over thirty years ago between the University of Birmingham and the Ironbridge Gorge Museum Trust (IGMT) which manages the World Heritage Site and ten museums. Our aims are: • To provide a welcoming intellectual home and a creative environment for the critical study of cultural heritage which offers new and challenging perspectives on the ways in which cultural heritage is understood, represented, managed and mobilised in different cultures and societies • To pursue research excellence, policy relevance and to engage with academic and policy communities and the heritage/ heritage-related sectors • To deliver research informed high quality postgraduate education linking theoretical understanding with practice and relevance.

        Description
        In the context of rapid cultural and economic globalisation, over half of the World’s population now live in urban areas. Through rural migration, new economic opportunities and enhanced global mobilities, cities and towns have expanded dramatically resulting in challenges to their character and identity. Visible changes in skylines and boundaries are also accompanied by less obvious shifts in how cities preserve, present and promote their pasts and traditions against fierce and competitive demands for space. Urban heritage, as the valued tangible and intangible legacies of the past, would appear to be an increasingly important asset for communities and governments alike, allowing cities to mark their distinctiveness, attract tourists and inward investment and, retain a historical narrative that feeds into the quality of life. At the same time, new heritage – the heritage of the future – is being created in cities and towns. This reflects the patterns and trends of wider economic, social and cultural change and is resulting in ‘starchitecture’ and new iconic structures, but also in small scale interventions whereby communities are creating and nurturing buildings, objects, spaces and practices that have meaning and value to them.

        In this context, this conference seeks to examine the processes of protecting, planning and promoting urban heritage in the face of on-going changes, pressures and opportunities at the global and the local level. We wish to better understand the ways in which heritage can be mobilised in the development of city well-being and the changing approaches to how it is managed, taking into account issues of ownership, responsibility, local and national economies and identities. Critically we address the question of long term sustainability and pose the question of what will future residents, communities and tourists inherit from their towns and cities?

        The Conference aims to provide critical dialogue beyond disciplinary boundaries and we invite papers from all disciplines and fields including: anthropology, architecture, archaeology, art history, cultural geography, cultural studies, design, ethnology and folklore, economics, history, heritage studies, landscape studies, leisure studies, museum studies, philosophy, political science, sociology, tourism studies, urban history, urban/spatial planning.

        We welcome perspectives on all aspects of urban heritage / heritage in the urban context – world heritage, historic urban landscapes, colonial heritage, religious heritage, intangible heritage and traditions, museum heritage, food heritage etc. Potential themes of interest include:

        - Innovative modalities of protection and planning urban heritage
        - Community approaches to and uses of, urban heritage
        - City based tourism and visitor economies of urban heritage
        - Urban heritage as a form of social resistance
        - Heritage as city memory
        - Cosmopolitan urban heritage and re-creating identities
        - Global and mega-city competition through heritage
        - Revitalising the city through heritage
        - Sub-urban and sub-altern heritage
        - Urban spaces, traditions and intangible heritage

        Please send a 300 word abstract of your paper with a clear title and full contact details to [email protected] as soon as possible but no later than Friday 20th November.

        Contact
        [email protected]

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        Inheriting the City: Advancing Understandings of Urban Heritage (all-day)