The Third Euroacademia International Conference: The European Union and the Politicization of Europe

The Euroacademia Convention of European Studies
 

The Third Euroacademia International Conference

The European Union and the Politicization of Europe

26 – 27 September 2014

Lisbon, Portugal

 
Deadline for Panel Proposals: 1 July 2014
Deadline for Paper Proposals: 15 August 2014
 

The European Union was described by Jacques Delors as an unidentified political object and by Jose Manuel Barroso as the first non-Imperial empire. The descriptors assigned to the European Union are creative and diverse yet the agreement on what is the actual shape that the EU is taking is by no means an easy one to be achieved. Historical choices shaped and reshaped the size and functioning of the EU while the goal of an emerging ‘ever closer union’ is still in search for the paths of real and not ideal accomplishment. The agreement seems to come when it’s about the growing impact of the decisions taken in Brussels on the daily lives of the European citizens and the increasingly redistributive outcomes of the policy choices inside the EU. These dynamics created the framework for the politicization of Europe and opened a vivid debate about the direction and proportions of such a process.

 

The politicization of Europe takes various shapes and addresses significant puzzles. While it is clear that the EU doesn’t resemble a state it is less clear if the decisions that shape its policies are configured by Pareto efficient outcomes or by dynamics that are intrinsic to a political system and defined by emerging party politics within the European Parliament. The democratic problem or the democratic deficit issue was and continues to be one of the main challenges facing the European Union in any terms or from any position is understood or described. The problem of accountability for the decision making inside the EU was there from the beginning and it emerged gradually as more emphatic on the agenda of vivid debates as the powers of the EU have grown after the Maastricht Treaty. This was concomitant with a growing disenchantment of citizens from member states with politics in general, with debates over the democratic deficits inside member states, with enlargement and with a visible and worrying decrease in voters’ turnouts at both national and especially European elections. The optimist supporters of EU believe in its power to constantly reinvent and reshape while the pessimists see either a persistence of existing problems or a darker scenario that could lead in front of current problems even to the end of the EU as we know it.

 

The Third Euroacademia International Conference ‘The European Union and the Politicization of Europe’ aims to survey some of these current debates and addresses once more the challenges of the EU polity in a context of multiple crises that confronted Europe in recent years. It supports a transformative view that involves balanced weights of optimism and pessimism in a belief that the unfold of current events and the way EU deals with delicate problems will put an increased pressure in the future on matters of accountability and will require some institutional adjustments that address democratic requirements for decision making. However in its present shape and context the EU does not look able to deliver soon appropriate answers to democratic demands. In a neo-functionalist slang we can say as an irony that the actual crisis in the EU legitimacy is a ‘spillover’ effect of institutional choices made some time before. To address the EU’s democratic deficit however is not to be a skeptic and ignore the benefits that came with it but to acknowledge the increasing popular dissatisfaction with ‘occult’ office politics and with the way EU tackles daily problems of public concern while the public is more and more affected by decisions taken at the European level.

 

Is the EU becoming an increasingly politicized entity? Is the on-going politicization of Europe a structured or a messy one? Do political parties within the European Parliament act in a manner that strengthens the view of the EU as an articulate political system? Are there efficient ways for addressing the democratic deficit issue? Can we find usable indicators for detecting an emerging European demos and a European civil society? Does a Europeanization of the masses take place or the EU remains a genuinely elitist project? Did the Lisbon Treaty introduced significant changes regarding the challenges facing the EU? Can we see any robust improvements in the accountability of the EU decision making processes? Are there alternative ways of looking at the politicization processes and redistributive policies inside the EU? These are only few of the large number of questions that unfold when researchers or practitioners look at the EU. It is the aim of the Third Euroacademia International Conference ‘The European Union and the Politicization of Europe’ to address in a constructive manner such questions and to offer o platform for dissemination of research results or puzzles that can contribute to a better understanding of the on-going process of politicization within the European Union.

The Third Euroacademia International Conference: The European Union and the Politicization of Europe is organized yet by no means restricted to the following orientative panels:
  • Assessing the State of the Union
  • The Politicization of Europe: Desirable or Contestable
  • Does the EU Resemble an Enlightened Despotism?
  • The EU as a Political System: Features and Curiosities
  • Redistributive Policies Inside the EU and their Impact on the Medium Voter
  • European Elections and Strategies for Politicization
  • European Parties and Party Politics in the European Parliament
  • Strategies for Bringing European Issues to Public Scrutiny
  • The Democratic Deficit Issue: A Persistent Anomaly?
  • In Search of a European Demos
  • European Union and the Claims of an Emerging Supranational Identity
  • Looking for a European Civil Society
  • Identity Making: Appropriations and Politicization of Wider European Values and Narratives
  • EUropean Identity and the Power of Naming the Other
  • Persisting Intergovernmentalism?
  • European Identities as Endogenous Factors in Explaining Political Behaviors
  • Scenarios for Change Inside the EU
  • The Future of EU Enlargement
  • Taking Euro-skepticism Seriously
  • Increasing Public Salience for Supranational Issues
  • History Reading and Identity Making in Europe
  • Ideal and Real Multiculturalism: How Inclusive European Societies Are?
  • Lobbying and Policy Making Inside the EU
  • European Foreign Policy: Is EU a Normative Power
  • Core/Periphery Claims in Shaping European Identities
  • Assessing the EU Neighborhood Policies
  • EU and the Limits of Solidarity
  • EU Cultural Symbols: Flags, Coins, Stamps and Anthems
  • Cosmopolitanism and Supra-National Identities
  • Differentiated Integration and Club Based Theories of Integration
  • EU and the US
  • EU and China
  • EU and Western Balkans
  • Protest and Mobilization Inside the EU
  • European Monetary Union: Crises and Solutions
  • Regional Integration Projects and Identity Appropriations
  • Globalization and EU Integration
  • EU and Conflict Resolution

However, if you are willing to propose and/or chair a particular panel we welcome you to advance your proposal until 15th of April 2014 in the Propose a Panel section on the conference website.

Each Panel may contain a maximum of 5 speakers and a Chair that will act also as a Discussant.
Deadline for Panel Proposals is 1st of July 2014

Panel Proposal

 

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Art as Cultural Diplomacy

 

Panel Organizer: Cassandra Sciortino, University of California, Santa Barbara


Panel Description

 

The panel “Art as cultural diplomacy” seeks papers that explore the function of art (in its broadest definition) as an instrument of cultural diplomacy by the state and, especially, by nongovernmental actors. The main theme of the session is the question of art and diplomacy in Europe before and after the fall of the Berlin Wall. Papers are welcome which explore issues related to the role of art, diplomacy and the politicization of the European Union and its candidate countries, as are those which consider how the arts have pursued or resisted East-West dichotomies and other narratives of alterity in Europe and worldwide.
 
This panel considers art as an instrument of cultural diplomacy and the EU’s goal of an ‘ever closer union’. In the context of multiple crises confronting Europe in recent years, how have the arts contributed to the politicization of Europe? The panel intends to assess the viability of consistent efforts aiming to emphasize how can art be used to establish, develop, and sustain productive relations between nations and other stakeholders in international relations. How can it serve as a neutral platform for exchange? How might it be employed as a vehicle for facilitating EU cohesion that is at once inter-culturally flexible and cohesive enough to project a unifying identity. How can public policy and other stakeholders craft a framework to measure the degrees of difference between art as instrument of cultural diplomacy or propaganda? Is it relevant to consider the concept of E-Diplomacy that is the digital revolution and the emergence of social media as platforms for art to communicate across social, cultural, and national boundaries?

 
The panel seeks to combine a wide range of interdisciplinary perspectives to explore how art–its various practices, history, and theory–are an important area of inquiry in the expanding field of cultural diplomacy. Selected papers will be invited for publication in a book.
 
Some examples of topics include:
 

  • How can art serve as a neutral platform for exchange to promote dialogue and understanding between foreign states?
  • How can art, including organized festivals (i.e. film, art, music.), cultivate transnational identities that undermine dichotomies of East and West, and other narratives of alterity in Europe and beyond it?
  • The implications for art as an instrument of diplomacy in a postmodern age where geopolitics and power are increasingly mobilized by image based structures of persuasion
  • How has/can art facilitate cohesion between European Union member states and candidate states that effectively responds to the EU’s efforts to create “unity in diversity.”
  • The politics of mapping Europe: mental and cartographic
  • Community based art as a social practice to engage issues of European identity
  • The difference between art as cultural diplomacy and propaganda
  • The digital revolution and the emergence of social media as platforms for art to communicate across social, cultural, and national boundaries?
  • Diplomacy in the history of art in Europe
  • Artists as diplomats
  • Art history as diplomacy–exhibitions, post-colonial criticism, global art history, and other revisions to the conventional boundaries of Europe and its history of art
  • The international activity of cultural institutes

Please apply on-line or submit abstracts of less than 300 words together with the details of affiliation by 15th of August 2014 to
cassandra.sciortino@berkeley.edu and application@euroacademia.eu

Performing Identity: The Relationship between Identity and Performance in Literature, Theatre and the Performing Arts

 

Panel Organizer: Dr. Panayiota Chrysochou

The University of Cyprus


Panel Description

 

Identity is often seen as being a controversial topic. Whether it is fictive or real, (de)politicized and/or aesthetic, gendered or engendered, identity is often seen as being a powerful political tool and an essentially social construct. It also allows individuals to define themselves. In a sense, we perform our own identities everyday – or, perhaps, we perform a wide range of different identities at any one time. We implicitly live in a society which constructs various definitive identifications, and which often sees the rigid maintenance of hierarchical systems and exclusive ideological constructions of gender, identity and sexuality, or what Judith Butler defines in her work Bodies that Matter as an ‘exclusionary matrix.’ This has often resulted in the displacement of any discursive systems which resist these exclusionary systems. This panel seeks to give voice to discursive systems which have so often been displaced by exclusionary systems of identification. The main exclusionary focus in culture and the arts has often been on the white, heterosexual and supremacist male (or female). To rectify this oversight, this panel seeks to address any works of art and culture which are directly and explicitly related to the performance of identity from a different standpoint – that is, one which is not exclusively heteronormative and heterosexual.
 

We welcome any papers which focus on the following topics:
 

  • Identity as a performative and political tool and/or as a site of political resistance and change
  • The work of gay/lesbian or drag performance artists who do not form part of the white, male/female and heterosexual/heteronormative matrix
  • Identity as a fluid and shifting construct in the theatre, the performing arts and literature generally
  • Cultural and literary works or works of art which resist fixed identifications and engender performative meanings/ways of ‘reading’
  • The abject as a site of identification
  • Gender and identity formation
  • Sexuality as a performative and identificatory construct or mode of identification

Please apply on-line or submit abstracts of less than 300 words together with the details of affiliation by 15th of August 2014 to application@euroacademia.eu

Identities and the Cities: Urban Transformations, Transition and Change in European Urban Image Construction

 


 


 

Panel Description

 

Elasticity of the label identity accommodates everything that does and does not surround us, thus finding its place in every discourse on making and re-making, invention and re-invention, destruction and construction. Every transition is synonymous with said processes, be it a tectonic change or a peaceful shift. As political systems and countries disintegrate and new ones rise, as they become more entangled in the global hyperspace, their skin changes in a manner of theatrical scenery change after each act, sometimes with discrete adaptation, sometimes with radical interventions. If the scenery is composed of streets, parks, roads, museums, monuments, shopping malls and buildings connected through the intricate network of the perpetual and cumulative actions of its inhabitants and the burden of their existence, if this setting is a city, every adaptation and intervention affects its multi-dimensional identities. However, can one speak of an identity of the urban space in the singular form?
 
As the chaotic canvases of cities are being stretched over a framework of identity, its further exploration seems more than appropriate. Amidst the incredibly rapid urban growth crowding more than half of the world population in towns and cities, the questions are only going to keep multiplying. How are city identities made and re-made, used and abused, imagined and narrated, politicised and communicated, expressed and projected, imposed and marketed? And above all, how do they thrive within the dynamic interpolation of the nexus of East-West, Europe-Balkans, centre-periphery, urban – suburban, old and new. As out-dated as these dichotomies sound, in many places their daily life is far from over. As old cities became new capitals and new capitals struggle for more capital, the challenges of maintaining state-driven collective identities in the face of cultural fragmentation and diversification, coupled with consumer-attractiveness is turning them into urban palimpsest. This transformation is ever more complex in the cities of Central, Eastern and South-eastern Europe. In these last decades, during the period of socio-political and cultural deconstruction, the redefinitions of their urban space reflect the need to refashion, consolidate or even establish their new/old identities. Flooded with imported ‘non-places’, (not) dealing with the material legacy of memories of the recent past that seem unable to resolve, trying to accept or reject the rest of Europe in the race towards ‘Europeanization’, these cities adopt different approaches in their aim to resemble and at the same time, differ. Zagreb generously welcomed its marketing nickname “pocket size Vienna”, while regenerating itself with the mega Museum of Contemporary Art tailored up to an imagined ‘Western European’ standard. Skopje’s attention seeking project transformed the ‘open city of solidarity’ into a literal national identity construction site. The list goes on. Queuing to win the old continent’s capital of culture contest and eager to squeeze into the ever-enlarging itinerary of the consumerist Grand Tour, the only thing cities are not allowed to be, is invisible.
 
As the research on cultural identities of the city is becoming more abundant, this panel aims at adopting a wide-lens inter-disciplinary approach, while focusing on various transitional processes affecting identities in the urban context in its global-regional-national-local interplay.
 

 
Some example of topics may include (but are not limited to):

  • Collective memory, identity and urban image construction
  • Appropriation, instrumentalisation and functualisation of public space
  • Contemporary nomadism and the city as a common denominator for collective identities
  • Architecture as ‘politics with bricks and mortar’
  • Is there a new rise of the city-state?
  • Urban regeneration projects, landmark buildings and ‘starchitects’
  • Non-places and (non)identities
  • Immigrants and the cultural identity of cities
  • City marketing and city branding
  • European capitals of culture and European identity
  • Identity creation and the cultural offer of the city
  • Urban cultural heritage as identity-anchor
  • Creative changes of the cities
  • Art and industry in urban development
  • Urban aesthetics
  • Ugliness, kitsch and value in shaping contemporary urban spaces
  • East-West nexuses in urban development
  • Selective urban memorialization through monuments and symbolic architecture
  • The future of urban visual identities

Please apply on-line or submit abstracts of less than 300 words together with the details of affiliation by 15th of August 2014 to application@euroacademia.eu

The Eurozone Crisis: Transformative Impact on the European Project and Model(s) of Capitalism

 

Panel Description

 

Europe in these days appears to move from one ‘crisis’ to the next. The deep and apparently perennial crisis of the Eurozone has been on the headlines for a couple of years now, and shows signs of a further exacerbation. The crisis raises several issues of interest for students of political science, political economy and international relations. What appears clear is that the problems of the Eurozone are signals of a weakening (if not an outright failure) of European integration as it was envisaged starting from the early 1990s. The political and cultural dimensions of the crisis of the Eurozone should thus not be overlooked, as well as its wider significance for the whole European project. The consequences of a falling apart of the Eurozone are unpredictable and may usher in a period of heightened political turbulence. In the wake of the Eurozone crisis, some commentators and scholars openly take into consideration the possibility that the European Union itself may be in danger. Moreover, the deeply transformative effects on the European model(s) of capitalism generated by the crisis are under everyone’s eyes.
 
The panel grapples with these issues adopting a wide outlook, welcoming contributions from students of economics or political economy, as well as political science and international relations.
 

We welcome any papers which focus on the following topics (but not exclusively):
 

  • - How can the crisis of the European project be understood with reference to the various theories of European integration?
  • - What agency is involved in the transformation of the European model(s) of capitalism?
  • - What does the crisis of the Eurozone mean for the European Union’s role in global political and economic affairs?
  • - The discourse and narrative of the Eurozone crisis: crisis for whom and for what purposes? Media and the crisis.

Please apply on-line or submit abstracts of less than 300 words together with the details of affiliation by 15th of August 2014 to application@euroacademia.eu

The Persistence of the Democratic Deficit in the European Union

 

Panel Description

 

Simon Hix (2008) was clear in describing the current state of the European Union (EU) as resembling rather an enlightened despotism than a genuine democratic polity. There is a wide variety of denominators for the EU in addressing its political structures of decision making and its inherent democratic deficit features, and yet there is still room for conceptual innovation. Historically, the EU is both curious and controversial: it is hard to explain from a state-centrist view the delegation of sovereignty and the fragile agreement on the gradual extension of EU powers together with externalizations of decision making to a polity that can be described, as Jacques Delors expressed it, as an unidentified political object. By interestingly portraying the EU as a neo-medieval empire, Jan Zielonka (2006) starts explicitly from the vagueness of the European construction in which “the European electorate can hardly execute democratic control over EU decision-makers if it does not really know what exact choices are being made by them”.
 
The democratic problem or the democratic deficit issue was and continues to be one of the main challenges facing the European Union in any terms or from any position is understood or described. The problem of accountability for the decision making inside the EU was there from the beginning and it emerged gradually as more emphatic on the agenda of vivid debates as the powers of the EU have grown after the Maastricht Treaty. This was concomitant with a growing disenchantment of citizens from member states with politics in general, with debates over the democratic deficits inside member states, with enlargement and with a visible and worrying decrease in voters’ turnouts at both national and especially European elections.
 
The optimist supporters of EU believe in its power to constantly reinvent and reshape while the pessimists see either a persistence of existing problems or a darker scenario that could lead in front of current problems even to the end of the EU as we know it.
 
This panel aims to surveys some of the current debates and to addresses once more the challenges of the EU polity in a context of multiple crises that confront Europe. It supports a moderate transformative view that involves balanced weights of optimism and pessimism in a belief that the unfold of current events and the way EU deals with delicate problems will put an increased pressure in the future on matters of accountability and will require some institutional adjustments that address democratic requirements for decision making.
 
In its present shape and context the EU does not look able to deliver soon appropriate answers to democratic demands. To address the EU’s democratic deficit however is not to be a skeptic and ignore the benefits that came with it but to acknowledge the increasing popular dissatisfaction with ‘occult’ office politics and with the way EU tackles daily problems of public concern while the public is more and more affected by decisions taken at the European level.
 

We welcome any papers which focus on the following topics:
 

  • The European Crisis and the Democratic Deficit
  • Accountability and Responsibility in EU Politics
  • The ECB: Taking Decisions in a Political Vacuum
  • Fallibility in EU Politics: Who Takes the Blame for Policy Mistakes
  • The Logic of Fait-Accompli
  • Domestic Uses of Success and Failure of EU Policies
  • Winners and Losers of Decision Making Processes
  • The EU Politics of Closed Doors
  • The Increasing Salience of EU Political Decision and Public Awareness
  • Blames and Shames of EU Politics
  • The Sacrifice of Democracy on the Altar of Integration
  • Is Really the EU as Democratic as it Can Be?
  • Ways of Increasing Accountability in the EU
  • The Efficiency Evaluators of Policy Making: Who is Responsible for Policy Failure?
  • Can the European Elections Become First Order Election?

Please apply on-line or submit abstracts of less than 300 words together with the details of affiliation by 15th of August 2014 to application@euroacademia.eu

Participant’s Profile

The conference is addressed to academics, researchers and professionals with a particular interest in Europe and European Union from all parts of the world. As the nature of the conference is intended to be multidisciplinary in nature different academic backgrounds are welcomed.

 

Post-graduate students, doctoral candidates and young researchers are welcomed to submit an abstract. Representatives of INGOs, NGOs, Think Tanks and activists willing to present their work with impact on or influenced by specific understandings of the European Union are welcomed as well to submit the abstract of their contribution.

 

Abstracts will be reviewed and the participants are selected based on the proven quality of the abstract. The submitted paper for the conference proceedings is expected to be in accordance with the lines provided in the submitted abstract.

The Participation Fee is 195 Euro

 

The participation fee includes:
  • the registration fee
  • all the materials for the conference
  • eligibility for inclusion in the conference proceedings publications
  • a copy of the electronic volume
  • access to Euroacademia discussion group and newsletters
  • discounted rates for participation in the future Euroacademia conferences
  • coffee brakes with snacks and fruits for all the duration of the conference
  • soft drinks for the whole duration of the conference
  • welcome drink and snacks on 26th of September 2014
  • a 3 course lunch on on 26th of September 2014 at 5* Restaurant Eurostars Das Letras
  • a 3 course lunch on 27st of September 2014 at 5* Restaurant Eurostars Das Letras
  • certificate of attendance
  • access to the optional social program

 

A registration form will be sent to accepted participants that must be filled in and sent to application@euroacademia.eu until 20th of August 2014 and until the 25th of August 2014, the payment of the participation fee through bank transfer is requested and considered as the final confirmation of attendance. No paper will be introduced in the program without confirmation and payment of the participant fee.
 

 

Please be aware that the final confirmation of attendance will be considered upon payment of the participation fee in the Euroacademia account:
 

Euroacademia

Name of the Bank: Belfius

Bank account IBAN: BE45 0688 9724 6589

BIC: GKCCBEBB

Branch: Agence BARRIERE – CHAUSSEE DE WATERLOO 216, 1060, BRUSSELS, BELGIUM


 


 

The participation fee can be paid only through bank transfer. A confirmation of receipt will be sent to selected participants by e-mail together with the scanned invoice. The original invoice will be delivered to accepted participants on site at the conference in the Participant’s Package.
 

Unfortunately, Euroacademia has no available funds for covering transport and accommodation in Lisbon. Participants are responsible for finding funding to cover transportation and accommodation costs during the whole period of the conference. Official letters can be sent by Euroacademia to the financing institution to confirm the selection and participation in the conference upon request.

Social Activities and Publication

A specific spot in the conference program will be dedicated to social networking and therefore all the participants interested in setting or developing further cooperation agendas and prospects with other participants will have time to present and/or promote their project and express calls for cooperation.

 

A specific setting (Social Corner) for promotional materials connected with the topic of the conference will be reserved for the use of the participants. Books authored or edited by the participants can be exhibited and promoted during the whole period of the conference and can also be presented within the conference package based on prior arrangements.

 

An optional dinner and a social event will be organized for the first and second evening of the conference as optional program for the willing participants. The social dinner will be held based on participant’s confirmation and its costs are to be covered individually by the participants.

 

Publication:

Selected papers will be published in an electronic volume with ISBN after the confirmation of the authors and a double peer-review process based on an agreed publication schedule. All the papers selected for publication should be original and must have not been priory published elsewhere. All participants to the conference will receive a copy of the volume.

Important Dates

 

Important Dates
1st of July 2014 Deadline for submitting Panel Proposals
15rd of August 2014 300 words abstracts and details of affiliation
16th of August 2014 Last notification of acceptance
20th of August 2014 Sending the Registration Form
25th of August 2014 Payment of the conference fee
10th of September 2014 Sending the draft paper to be uploaded on the web site of the conference
15th of September 2014 Publication of the conference program and uploading the draft papers on the website
26th of September 2014 The conference commences at 9.30 am

Venue and Directions

The conference will take place in the conference premises of the exclusive 5 stars Hotel Eurostars das Letras, centrally located in the heart of Lisbon, easily accessible from the historic center and within a walking distance from all the major tourist attractions. Hotel Eurostars das Letras is a universe of culture and literature. A melting pot of languages and alphabets. A space specially thought out for people who enjoy reading. A hotel that lives and breathes literature. This is the Eurostars Das Letras, possibly the most literary hotel on the whole continent.

Hotel Eurostars das Letras is one of the most rewarding and breakaway novelties that has happened in the last few years by the Tagus estuary. It is a luxury establishment where the secret ingredients of our recipe are blended in perfect proportions: design, top quality comfort, the latest in technological advances and, of course, literature and more literature.

 

Eurostars Das Letras Hotel

Rua Castilho 6-12 – 1250-069 Lisbon Portugal
Tel: + 35 1213 573 094,

email: reservas@eurostarsdasletras.com



 

Flanked by two large, emblematic Lisbon spaces, the Botanical Gardens and the Avenida da Liberdade, the Eurostars Das Letras enjoys a privileged location in the Portuguese capital, exactly at the point where the business city and the tourist and shopping areas meet.
 
An endless assortment of Lisbon attractions are available within walking distance from the main door of the hotel: Praça Marques de Pombal, Santa Justa, Bairro Alto and its cultural and night-time offers, the Chiado and its book stores, the Castle of Sao Jorge, Alfama, Rossío Square, Praça do Comércio, Praça do Municipio, Rua da Prata, Graça, Lapa and even the streets close to the Benfica area.
 
The hotel is surrounded by excellent restaurants and boutiques, such as Hugo Boss, Louis Vuiton or Cartier. By public transport, the hotel is easily accessible from the Airport, Santa Apolonia Station and other emblematic places in the city, like the Belem district or the Parque das Naçoes, with the Estaçao de Oriente designed by Santiago Calatrava or the impressive Oceanarium.



See full information about the conference Location & Map:

HERE


 

Conference participants are responsible for arranging the accommodation and travel. However, discounted rates for the Eurostars Das Letras Hotel can be arranged by organizers and announced to selected participants upon request.




The Third Euroacademia International Conference: The European Union and the Politicization of Europe

Extended Deadline for Applications: 15rd of August 2014

Application Form

 

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